I Used to Know That, Patrick Scrivenor
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Patrick Scrivenor

I Used to Know That

Федор Фаустов
Федор Фаустовhar citeratförra månaden
to be read to out of up for
Федор Фаустов
Федор Фаустовhar citeratförra månaden
Never use a preposition to end a sentence with
Федор Фаустов
Федор Фаустовhar citeratförra månaden
Irregular verbs just have to be learnt – sorry, learned
Ekaterina Kuznetsova
Ekaterina Kuznetsovahar citeratför 5 månader sedan
When adjectives are treated as collective nouns – the needy, the unemployed, the good, the wealthy – they are always plural:
The unemployed are mostly young and homeless.
Ekaterina Kuznetsova
Ekaterina Kuznetsovahar citeratför 5 månader sedan
There is no hard-and-fast rule
Ekaterina Kuznetsova
Ekaterina Kuznetsovahar citeratför 5 månader sedan
Are you red hot on the use of the subjunctive? Is it your second nature never to use a preposition at the end of a sentence?
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
It means simply one form of a verb that acts as a noun (there are others).
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
a covey of grouse
a flock of birds
a herd of cattle
a pod of dolphins
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
In British English, collective nouns are usually singular if the ‘collective’ is being thought of as a unit:
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
‘Less’ is used with uncountable nouns
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
‘Fewer’ is used with countable nouns:
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
The ‘parts of speech’ classify words by what they do. So, nouns name people and things, verbs express action, adjectives modify nouns, adverbs modify verbs and so on.
anastasiasoloviovaua
anastasiasoloviovauahar citerati fjol
But their similarities far outweigh their divergences, and Standard English is well on the way to becoming an international language among people educated in a certain way and to a certain level.
Darima
Darimahar citeratför 2 år sedan
When adjectives are treated as collective nouns – the needy, the unemployed, the good, the wealthy – they are always plural:
The unemployed are mostly young and homeless.
Darima
Darimahar citeratför 2 år sedan
But they can be plural if the members of the group are thought of as individuals:
The family are at odds about Christmas.
Darima
Darimahar citeratför 2 år sedan
Collective nouns name a group or number of people or things:
committee
family
herd
team
In British English, collective nouns are usually singular if the ‘collective’ is being thought of as a unit:
The committee was unable to meet.
Darima
Darimahar citeratför 2 år sedan
Less’ is used with uncountable nouns:
There is less traffic today.
Darima
Darimahar citeratför 2 år sedan
‘Fewer’ is used with countable nouns:
There are fewer cars today.
Darima
Darimahar citeratför 2 år sedan
If you can ask the question, ‘How many?’ you have a countable noun. You can ask, ‘How many cars?’ but you can’t ask, ‘How many distance?’
Света
Светаhar citeratför 2 år sedan
Regretfully/regrettably Regretfully means with regret or in a regretful manner: I must regretfully decline your invitation. Regrettably means to be regretted: Regrettably, all the casualties were caused by ‘friendly fire’.
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